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THE CARE YOU CAN COUNT ON!
~ CAREGIVERS SUPPORT GROUPS

All support groups are FREE and open to the public. If you are interested in starting a group or interested in active support groups.


Sheila Wicklow
Director of Adult Day Programs

Contact Sheila via email or telephone for information about upcoming meetings or to be included on our mailing list.

845.339.6683, ext. 3303
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For more information and contacts for support groups,
CLICK HERE.

Symptoms for Alzheimer’s

The most common early symptom of Alzheimer's is difficulty remembering newly learned information because Alzheimer changes typically begin in the part of the brain that affects learning. As Alzheimer's advances through the brain it leads to increasingly severe symptoms, including disorientation, mood and behavior changes; deepening confusion about events, time and place; unfounded suspicions about family, friends and professional caregivers; more serious memory loss and behavior changes; and difficulty speaking, swallowing and walking.

In the early stages of dementia, the person may withdraw from activities he or she previously enjoyed. It is important to help the person remain engaged. Having an open discussion around any concerns and making slight adjustments can make a difference. For example, a large social gathering may be overwhelming, but the person may be able to interact more successfully in smaller groups.

As Alzheimer's progresses, you may need to make other adjustments to the activity. Use the following tips:
•Keep the person's skills and abilities in mind. A person with dementia may be able to play simple songs learned on the piano years ago. Bring these types of skills into daily activities.

•Pay special attention to what the person enjoys. Take note when the person seems happy, anxious, distracted or irritable. Some people enjoy watching sports, while others may be frightened by the pace or noise.

•Consider if the person begins activities without direction. Does he or she set the table before dinner or sweep the kitchen floor mid-morning? If so, you may wish to plan these activities as part of the daily routine.

•Be aware of physical problems. Does he or she get tired quickly or have difficulty seeing, hearing or performing simple movements?

•Focus on enjoyment, not achievement. Find activities that build on remaining skills and talents. A professional artist might become frustrated over the declining quality of work, but an amateur might enjoy a new opportunity for self expression. For activity ideas email us at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it Every day, caregivers like you share new ideas and encourage one another.

•Encourage involvement in daily life. Activities that help the individual feel like a valued part of the household — like setting the table — can provide a sense of success and accomplishment.

Please contact us for more information at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it or call 845.339.6683, ext. 3303.


 

Location: 918 Ulster Avenue, Kingston, New York 12401 Mailing: PO Box 1850, Kingston, New York 12402 Phone: 845.339.6683 Fax: 845.339.7319

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